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Tiger Tracks: Time Management

A collaboration between GC Academic Success & the Ensor LRC.

students

Schedule

I don't have enough time! 

  • Keep a calendar with your biggest assignments - upcoming papers, exams, and projects - so that you don't lose sight of what is due. 
  • Make the most of your time by using your free 15 minutes here, 30 minutes there to knock out small assignments, meet with tutors, and review class notes. 

Everybody's Weakness...

Procrastination. 

If you identify as a procrastinator, you are certainly not alone! Procrastination is a common problem that can cause major issues if left untamed. Here are a few helpful hints for those of us (err...I mean...you) who struggle with procrastination:

1. Break your tasks down into manageable pieces. 

If you know your time is limited and/or your responsibilities seem overwhelming, take on your assignments one piece at a time. If you have a big paper due, start completing small tasks several weeks in advance. On the first day, pick a topic. On the second day, spend 15 minutes creating a timeline of small goals. On the third day, spend some time drafting an outline. On the fourth day, think of a gripping way to begin your introduction. By the week the paper is due, you will be well on your way to a final draft having dedicated small but consistent amounts of time to the assignment. 

2. Write something...anything!

Starting your assignment is usually the hardest part. Your first draft does not have to be perfect - it does not even have to be good! Once you start writing or start working, it will kick your mind into gear and help you get over the procrastination slump that tells you to keep Netflix-ing rather than start that assignment. Once you're in the mode of studying you can refine the work that is not up to par. 

3. Reward yourself. 

You know what motivates you better than anybody else. Reward yourself with a coffee from the Mulberry, an evening out with friends, or even a 30 minute television show. Set small goals for yourself and reward yourself with breaks - just don't give in to those urges before you do the work! 

 

Pomodoro Technique

The Pomodoro Technique is a popular time management method developed to help reward yourself with short and long breaks to increase productivity! There are several FREE apps that allow you to set timers and track your work using this technique, including PomoDone, Focus Booster, Marinara Timer, and Pomodoro Keeper. Here's how the Pomodoro Technique works:

  1. Decide on a task.
  2. Set a pomodoro timer (25 minutes).
  3. Work on the task during this time.
  4. End work when the timer rings and put a checkmark on a piece of paper.
  5. Take a short break (3-5 minutes). 
  6. After four pomodoros (four checkmarks), take a longer break (15–30 minutes), then repeat the process. 

 

 

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